Artists Who’s Work Was Deemed Too X-Rated By The Censors

For a working artist or musician, the last thing you’d expect it to be slapped in the face with a censorship sticker. Especially with the mass amount of real and potentially upsetting affairs seen in News and Media outlets today.

However, In this list, we will be taking a look at the top 5 artists who’s live, video or audio work was either banned or heavily frowned upon for reasons that were categorized as too inappropriate for audiences.

1.Eminem 

To promote the release of his album ‘Relapse’ in 2009, Eminem filmed and released a teaser for the album. The teaser shows the rapper bathing in what is later to be believed as blood. This was seen as to violent and ‘Bloody’ for viewers and wasn’t aired as it was originally intended.

You can only find the video online: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=eminem+relapse+teaser

2. Elvis Costello

During his 1977 appearance on ‘Saturday Night Live’, he was told not to play his song ‘Radio, Radio’ as it “presented anti-media feelings”. Instead Costello and his band started playing ‘Less than Zero’. However, 8 seconds in, and he changed it to the controversial ‘Radio, Radio’.

3. Roger Rudenstein

Roger Rudenstein, a accomplished and well respected composer entered the X-rated genre, when he took James Joyce’ ‘Ulysses’, translating the script into music form, and in keeping true to the original, Roger is now ready to take this opus to European shores.

4. Garth Brooks

Fun-loving, country music good guy had a massive hit with the release of his 1990 single ‘The Thunder Rolls’. The music video however was a different story. In the video, a woman was subject to domestic abuse, which major country video networks such as CMT and TNN saw as unsuitable, making Garth eligible for this list.

5. The Beatles

Similar to Roger, the lyrical content that the Beatles were releasing was subject BBC censorship. Songs such as “Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds” and “A Day in the Life” were banned due to drug references, which would ruin the BBC’s ‘squeaky clean’ reputation.